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Forum Home > Plastico: Otros barcos militares - Plastic:Other military Ships > 1/350 Hasegawa Japaneses Icebreaker SOYA

pedro.negron
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In November 1939 the Imperial Japanese Navy requisitioned the Chiryo Maru for national service. In February 1940 she was renamed the Soya, a name previously held by the former Varyag, an armoured cruiser seized from Imperial Russia but which Japan returned in 1916. The icebreaker Soya was assigned duties as an auxiliary ammunition supply and survey vessel. She survived the Second World War, albeit with multiple close calls. In January 1943 the Soya was attacked by the USS Greenling. The torpedoes either missed or proved to be duds: Soya's crew hoisted one undetonated torpedo onto the deck in celebration. In February 1944 aircraft from TF58 attacked the Japanese anchorage at Truk, sinking 41 Japanese vessels. The Soya escaped but ran aground as she did so. Ten crewmembers were killed. On 26 June 1945 the USS Parche attacked a convoy escorting Soya and other transport ships from Yokohama to Hakodate, sinking an escort vessel and disabling one transport ship. And on 9 August 1945 Soya was at anchor in Onagawa Bay as part of a flotilla with other vessels when British bombers attacked from the air, sinking at least two of them.



POSTWAR

She undertook numerous missions embarking troops and passengers, including calls at Shanghai, Tinian and Guam. In light of her ice-breaking ability, she was also assigned northerly missions and by 1948 had made 14 voyages to and from Sakhalin island, the former Karafuto, evacuating citizens by agreement with the new authorities from what was now the Soviet Union

ANTARTIC RESEARCH

In 1950 the ship received a comprehensive refit in preparation for service as Japan's first dedicated Antarctic research ship. In 1956 further modifications included the replacement of her steam engine with twin diesel engines and the installation of a helicopter deck with the ability to store light helicopters for voyage. In 1957 her forward gunwale was built up and 1958 a further refit added a second, larger helicopter deck above the earlier one, which became a vast new storage space. Between 1956 to 1962 the Soya undertook missions to the Antarctic. Her second voyage, in 1958, made headlines worldwide when she rescued personnel stranded at the Showa Station (Antarctica) research station in the face of approaching winter. The evacuation did not extend to the mission's dogs, and 15 Karafuto-ken huskies were abandoned to fend for themselves on the ice. The following spring the ship returned to find two dogs still alive. The mutts, named Taro and Jiro, became bywords in Japan for fortitude. The story travelled worldwide thanks in part to two movies: Nankyoku Monogatari (lit. "South Pole Story"; released in the U.S. as "Antarctica") and a treatment by Disney in the Hollywood film Eight Below.The Soya herself experienced hardship during her time in the Antarctic, including becoming stuck in the ice and needing assistance from the nearby Russian icebreaker "Ob".

MUSEUM SHIP

The Soya was fully decommissioned in 1978. Her last mission was a farewell tour to communities she had served, including the port of Hakodate, and photographs exist from this period of wellwishers swarming the ship before her departure. In 1979 the Soya was moored alongside at the Museum of Maritime Science, Tokyo, and remains open to the public as a museum ship, open daily and generally closed only when typhoons threaten Tokyo. She remains in largely original condition. Her propellers have been removed and placed on deck but her interior is largely intact from Antarctic exploration days. However, as a result of modifications made in the 1950s her superstructure has changed considerably from her appearance during World War Two. Gone are the tall funnel and aft crane assembly, while the addition of a helicopter landing deck and higher forward gunwales give her a beefier appearance than the cargo ship she set out in life as.

THE KIT


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Pedro J Negron

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email: Pedro.negron@gmail.com


July 2, 2015 at 1:39 PM Flag Quote & Reply

pedro.negron
Site Owner
Posts: 747

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Pedro J Negron

Webmaster

email: Pedro.negron@gmail.com


July 2, 2015 at 1:59 PM Flag Quote & Reply

pedro.negron
Site Owner
Posts: 747

--

Pedro J Negron

Webmaster

email: Pedro.negron@gmail.com


July 2, 2015 at 2:15 PM Flag Quote & Reply

pedro.negron
Site Owner
Posts: 747

Pictures of the Soya at the Tokyo Bay. it was the first Japanese ship used for exploration in Antarctica.

The expedition members were forced to make an emergency evacuation and, they couldn’t take the dogs with them. Believing that the rescue team will arrive in a few days, they left some food and departed. The weather turned bad and the rescue team couldn’t reach the base.

 

A new expedition arrived after a year and found two dogs alive: Taro and Jiro. The two dogs somehow managed to broke free from the chains and managed to survive. Taro and Jiro, were saved and brought back to Japan. Taro and Jiso were declared heroes, and in 1983, a film was made about their story.



More pictures in ModelWarships.com


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Pedro J Negron

Webmaster

email: Pedro.negron@gmail.com


March 16, 2017 at 11:38 AM Flag Quote & Reply

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